Transparency–reports become the pane of glass

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The journey to becoming a data led organisation through the implementation of a data centric reporting structure

When you ask yourself the question “what does reporting mean to me?” It is a highly subjective question. The answer is of course that reporting means different things to almost everyone in an organisation, Team leaders will use it monitor and manage their teams, while C-level consumers will use it to validate and assess progress along strategic goals. The promise of Big Data and in many ways the biggest value add that it can bring to any business is that suddenly it is possible to have everyone accessing the same data ideally through the same dashboards.

The idea of transparency scares a lot of people, but the bigger question is of course is it right to be afraid to be transparent internally? Under no circumstances am I advocating a showing customers a warts and all reporting window, but internally we must. All too often strategic goals have been created or devised using pie in the sky highly spun tales of business performance and then success is equally measured on these spun metrics. Therein lies challenge #1 of moving your organisation down the transparent route – Performance Tweaking.

Performance Tweaking – The act of presenting your performance by excluding “outliers”

Removing outliers or areas outside your control is internally – for many organisations – standard practice, however if you look at what can be done when a corporation reports financial  data you’ll see a radical shift – transparency – a business cannot just exclude bad transactions and only report on successful ones, they can classify the bad as such but still it must be accounted for. Day one on your journey to transparent reporting will no doubt involve a good deal of this – assessing what goes into metrics and how to balance the view, a team leader will want to see everything but they will not want “everything” to be seen by a C-level.

Challenge #2 – Fear – “What would happen if a C-Level drilled down to my team to see what they’re doing!” normally disguised as “Senior managers don’t have time to look at all the data so why make it available?” The goal of transparency is that absolutely everything should be available to everyone, and make no mistake like any new tool/toy it will be experimented with when it is first received leading to some very difficult – but ultimately worthwhile conversations as alignment begins be achieved. Make no mistake however after the launch and the first couple of weeks the toy becomes a tool and a tool is there to be used. The fear however that someone else of another manager or even worse someone senior will know more than “me” is a terrifying one. Traditionally businesses run internally on a currency of Information. The information I have about how my team/department/division runs enforces the traditional hierarchical management chains and serves to enforce practices that in the information age can ultimately be counter productive.

Fear – The fear that others may come to know more about my area of responsibility than I do

Challenge #3 – the unmentionable – the third challenge is often the most difficult, it is characterised by the throw away comment of “this is too complex for me” and “I’m not an analyst how can I be expected to understand this?” The reality is that in many ways this is one of the biggest enemies to progress, the view that a big data tool, must somehow be too complex for any “normal” consumer to understand. In truth this is proof of the requirement to have a clear development model with a consumer focused design philosophy, your single pane of glass must have a clear and simple layout that is both intuitive and self guiding.

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